A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Tuesday

<May 25, 2021>

Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.3

Daily Devotional: Angels/Apostles Gift of the Holy Spirit: Piety—the gift of filial love for God that moves the soul to worship and protects against the hardening of one’s heart in the midst of trials. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the Holy Spirit.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, may we take comfort in the Invisible Reality. There is no division between heaven and earth. All of heaven is available to us if we but ask. Jesus: Jesus was gentle with the woman caught in adultery. May we imitate His gentleness in dealing with others.
Glorious Characteristic: Identity—we will retain our original identity. We will be essentially the same person as before we died. (John 20:11-16) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Admonish sinners Corporal Work of Mercy: Welcome those away from home (the Church). Shelter the homeless. Sacrament: Communion Commandment:
  1. You shall not kill.
Thought for the Day: St. Augustine: “You have made us for yourself, O Lord; our hearts are restless until they rest in Thee.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Mary Magdelene de’ Pazzi

Mystical ecstasy is the elevation of the spirit to God in such a way that the person is aware of this union with God while both internal and external senses are detached from the sensible world. Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi was so generously given this special gift of God that she is called the “ecstatic saint.”
Catherine de’ Pazzi was born into a noble family in Florence in 1566. The normal course would have been for her to have married into wealth and enjoyed comfort, but Catherine chose to follow her own path. At 9, she learned to meditate from the family confessor. She made her first Communion at the then-early age of 10, and made a vow of virginity one month later. At 16, Catherine entered the Carmelite convent in Florence because she could receive Communion daily there.
Catherine had taken the name Mary Magdalene and had been a novice for a year when she became critically ill. Death seemed near, so her superiors let her make her profession of vows in a private ceremony from a cot in the chapel. Immediately after, Mary Magdalene fell into an ecstasy that lasted about two hours. This was repeated after Communion on the following 40 mornings. These ecstasies were rich experiences of union with God and contained marvelous insights into divine truths.
As a safeguard against deception and to preserve the revelations, her confessor asked Mary Magdalene to dictate her experiences to sister secretaries. Over the next six years, five large volumes were filled. The first three books record ecstasies from May of 1584 through Pentecost week the following year. This week was a preparation for a severe five-year trial. The fourth book records that trial and the fifth is a collection of letters concerning reform and renewal. Another book, Admonitions, is a collection of her sayings arising from her experiences in the formation of women religious.
The extraordinary was ordinary for this saint. She read the thoughts of others and predicted future events. During her lifetime, Mary Magdalene appeared to several persons in distant places and cured a number of sick people.
It would be easy to dwell on the ecstasies and pretend that Mary Magdalene only had spiritual highs. This is far from true. It seems that God permitted her this special closeness to prepare her for the five years of desolation that followed when she experienced spiritual dryness. She was plunged into a state of darkness in which she saw nothing but what was horrible in herself and all around her. She had violent temptations and endured great physical suffering. Mary Magdalene de’ Pazzi died in 1607 at age 41, and was canonized in 1669. Her Liturgical Feast Day is May 25.

St. Mary Magdelene de’ Pazzi, pray for us.

Franciscan Media https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-of-the-day/saint-mary-magdalene-de-pazzi

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

Resources