A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Saturday

<April 3, 2021>

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.7

Daily Devotional: The Blessed Virgin Mary Gift of the Holy Spirit: Wisdom—the gift of contemplative reflection on, and love for, divine things. It enables one to assess the world by revealed truths and instills peace in the soul. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting.” The Blessed Mother: May we experience God’s protection as Mary did, by imitating her obedience to God’s Will. Protection Through Obedience. Jesus: The life of Christ exemplified prudence, always seeking to do God’s Will alone. May we do the same.
Glorious Characteristic: Impassability—we will be immune from death and pain. (Rev 21:4, I Cor 15:50-57) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Forgive offenses. Corporal Work of Mercy: Give drink to the thirsty. Sacrament: Anointing of the Sick Commandments:
  1. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
  2. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Do whatever He tells you.”

Today’s Reading

Holy Saturday

Holy Saturday is the period of Holy Week when Catholics remember Jesus’ entombment. It is a preparation day. Today is a day of quiet and prayerful reflection on the true gravity of the crucifixion and Jesus’ redemptive sacrifice. Throughout the world our Churches are empty of the Blessed Sacrament and quiet in anticipation of Easter’s triumph over darkness and evil, sin and death.
The quietness of the day permits us to ponder the implications of physical death and how each of us in life and death, affects others. The day before Easter also permits the Elect and the Catechumens a period of solitude and reflection as they prepare to participate in a most meaningful manner in the Sacraments of Initiation. After the frantic activities of Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday & Good Friday…Holy Saturday is a pregnant pause before the realization of the resurrection is realized on Easter Sunday morning.
This period should be prayerful and quiet, as well as contemplative of the chronological and historical events that we call the Passion. This day should also provide anticipatory happiness as we prepare to celebrate the New Passover. Holy Saturday permits us to deeply saturate our parched theological spirits in images of the waters of Baptism, and symbols of restored life. This evening Mother Church will initiate a new fire and the Paschal Candle will stand in our churches providing radiant light and reminding us of Jesus’ Easter triumph. We will profess our faith in the Creed, along with our newly initiated brothers and sisters. We will partake in the Eucharistic sacrifice, now the unbloody reenactment of Calvary.
In our Churches, new water will be blessed and there will be a sprinkling over all of us to recount our sacramental incorporation through the living waters of baptism, the warming power of the Holy Spirit in confirmation and the nourishment provided through our Eucharist, Jesus, the Bread of Life. It is a good and appropriate thing that this Holy Saturday period is quiet and contemplative, relaxed and subtly expectant.
The Easter Vigil and all of the subsequent liturgies of Easter will explode our sensual perceptions and provide us with a liturgical extravaganza of auditory, tactile and sensory stimulations. As we participate in the theological burst of liturgical expressions of Jesus’ resurrected glory, we are able to closely relate to the Apostles, to Mary and to all the believers in Jerusalem on that first Easter morning. Sorrow turns to joy, darkness is transformed into new light and our joyous expectations of new and eternal life are renewed.
Our faith will again feel the intensity of the Paschal Mystery as the entire communion of the Church proclaims, “Alleluia! Alleluia!” We should most deeply recall the prayer from the blessing of the Paschal candle. “Christ yesterday and today, the First and the Last, the Beginning and the End, the Alpha and Omega. All time belongs to Him and all glory, forever and ever. Amen.

Hugh McNichol https://www.catholic.org/featured/headline.php?ID=5464

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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