A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.2

Daily Devotional: Holy Spirit/Holy Souls Gift of the Holy Spirit: Knowledge—the correct estimation of created things and their relative value before God. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in Jesus Christ.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, let us look to Jesus as our Good Shepherd. Jesus: In imitation of Jesus, let us imitate His generosity of heart in being merciful to others.
Glorious Characteristic: Integrity—we will retain all the parts of our old bodies, our bodies will be complete. (John 20:24-27) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Comfort the sorrowful. Corporal Work of Mercy: Comfort the imprisoned. Sacrament: Confirmation Commandment:
  1. Honor your father and mother.
Thought for the Day: Adapted from Mother Teresa: Prayer leads to humility, which leads to obedience, which leads to love, which leads to eternal life.

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Jerome Emiliani

Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn’t care much about God because he didn’t need him — he had his own strength and the strength of his soldiers and weapons. When Venice’s enemies, the League of Cambrai, captured the fortress, he was dragged off and imprisoned. There in the dungeon, Jerome decided to get rid of the chains that bound him. He let go of his worldly attachments and embraced God.
When he finally was able to escape, he hung his metal chains in the nearby church of Treviso — in gratitude not only for being freed from physical prison but from his spiritual dungeon as well.
After a short time as mayor of Treviso he returned his home in Venice where he studied for the priesthood. The war may have been over but it was followed by the famine and plague war’s devastation often brought. Thousands suffered in his beloved city. Jerome devoted himself to service again — this time, not to the military but the poor and suffering around him. He felt a special call to help the orphans who had no one to care for them. All the loved ones who would have protected them and comforted them had been taken by sickness or starvation. He would become their parent, their family.
Using his own money, he rented a house for the orphans, fed them, clothed them, and educated them. Part of his education was to give them the first known catechetical teaching by question and answer. But his constant devotion to the suffering put him in danger too and he fell ill from the plague himself. When he recovered, he had the ideal excuse to back away, but instead his illness seemed to take the last links of the chain from his soul. Once again he interpreted his suffering to be a sign of how little the ambitions of the world mattered.
He committed his whole life and all he owned to helping others. He founded orphanages in other cities, a hospital, and a shelter for prostitutes. This grew into a congregation of priests and brothers that was named after the place where they had a house: the Clerks Regular of Somascha. Although they spent time educating other young people, their primary work was always Jerome’s first love — helping orphans.
His final chains fell away when he again fell ill while taking care of the sick. He died in 1537 at the age of 56.
He is the patron saint of abandoned children and orphans.

In His Footsteps:
Become a foster parent. Millions of children need the love and care of a foster family. Contact your local Family Services agency or Catholic Charities to find out how you can help.

Prayer:
Saint Jerome Emiliani, watch over all children who are abandoned or unloved. Give us the courage to show them God’s love through our care. Help us to lose the chains that keep us from living the life God intended for us. Amen
St. Jerome, pray for us.

Catholic Online https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=61

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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