A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.7

Daily Devotional: The Blessed Virgin Mary Gift of the Holy Spirit: Wisdom—the gift of contemplative reflection on, and love for, divine things. It enables one to assess the world by revealed truths and instills peace in the soul. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting.” The Blessed Mother: May we experience God’s protection as Mary did, by imitating her obedience to God’s Will. Protection Through Obedience. Jesus: The life of Christ exemplified prudence, always seeking to do God’s Will alone. May we do the same.
Glorious Characteristic: Impassability—we will be immune from death and pain. (Rev 21:4, I Cor 15:50-57) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Forgive offenses. Corporal Work of Mercy: Give drink to the thirsty. Sacrament: Anointing of the Sick Commandments:
  1. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
  2. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Do whatever He tells you.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of The Chair of Saint Peter the Apostle

This feast commemorates Christ’s choosing Peter to sit in his place as the servant-authority of the whole Church.
After the “lost weekend” of pain, doubt, and self-torment, Peter hears the Good News. Angels at the tomb say to Magdalene, “The Lord has risen! Go, tell his disciples and Peter.” John relates that when he and Peter ran to the tomb, the younger outraced the older, then waited for him. Peter entered, saw the wrappings on the ground, the headpiece rolled up in a place by itself. John saw and believed. But he adds a reminder: “…[T]hey did not yet understand the scripture that he had to rise from the dead” (John 20:9). They went home. There the slowly exploding, impossible idea became reality. Jesus appeared to them as they waited fearfully behind locked doors. “Peace be with you,” he said (John 20:21b), and they rejoiced.
The Pentecost event completed Peter’s experience of the risen Christ. “…[T]hey were all filled with the holy Spirit” (Acts 2:4a) and began to express themselves in foreign tongues and make bold proclamation as the Spirit prompted them.
Only then can Peter fulfill the task Jesus had given him: “… [O]nce you have turned back, you must strengthen your brothers” (Luke 22:32). He at once becomes the spokesman for the Twelve about their experience of the Holy Spirit—before the civil authorities who wished to quash their preaching, before the Council of Jerusalem, for the community in the problem of Ananias and Sapphira. He is the first to preach the Good News to the Gentiles. The healing power of Jesus in him is well attested: the raising of Tabitha from the dead, the cure of the crippled beggar. People carry the sick into the streets so that when Peter passed his shadow might fall on them.
Even a saint experiences difficulty in Christian living. When Peter stopped eating with Gentile converts because he did not want to wound the sensibilities of Jewish Christians, Paul says, “…I opposed him to his face because he clearly was wrong…. [T]hey were not on the right road in line with the truth of the gospel…” (Galatians 2:11b, 14a).
At the end of John’s Gospel, Jesus says to Peter, “Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go” (John 21:18). What Jesus said indicated the sort of death by which Peter was to glorify God. On Vatican Hill, in Rome, during the reign of Nero, Peter did glorify his Lord with a martyr’s death, probably in the company of many Christians.
Second-century Christians built a small memorial over his burial spot. In the fourth century, the Emperor Constantine built a basilica, which was replaced in the 16th century.

St. Peter, pray for us.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/chair-of-saint-peter/

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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