A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.7

Daily Devotional: The Blessed Virgin Mary Gift of the Holy Spirit: Wisdom—the gift of contemplative reflection on, and love for, divine things. It enables one to assess the world by revealed truths and instills peace in the soul. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting.” The Blessed Mother: May we experience God’s protection as Mary did, by imitating her obedience to God’s Will. Protection Through Obedience. Jesus: The life of Christ exemplified prudence, always seeking to do God’s Will alone. May we do the same.
Glorious Characteristic: Impassability—we will be immune from death and pain. (Rev 21:4, I Cor 15:50-57) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Forgive offenses. Corporal Work of Mercy: Give drink to the thirsty. Sacrament: Anointing of the Sick Commandments:
  1. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
  2. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Do whatever He tells you.”

Today’s Reading

Feast day of All Souls

The Story of the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed

The Church has encouraged prayer for the dead from the earliest times as an act of Christian charity. “If we had no care for the dead,” Augustine noted, “we would not be in the habit of praying for them.” Yet pre-Christian rites for the deceased retained such a strong hold on the superstitious imagination that a liturgical commemoration was not observed until the early Middle Ages, when monastic communities began to mark an annual day of prayer for the departed members.
In the middle of the 11th century, Saint Odilo, abbot of Cluny, France, decreed that all Cluniac monasteries offer special prayers and sing the Office for the Dead on November 2, the day after the feast of All Saints. The custom spread from Cluny and was finally adopted throughout the Roman Church.
The theological underpinning of the feast is the acknowledgment of human frailty. Since few people achieve perfection in this life but, rather, go to the grave still scarred with traces of sinfulness, some period of purification seems necessary before a soul comes face-to-face with God. The Council of Trent affirmed this purgatory state and insisted that the prayers of the living can speed the process of purification.
Superstition easily clung to the observance. Medieval popular belief held that the souls in purgatory could appear on this day in the form of witches, toads or will-o’-the-wisps. Graveside food offerings supposedly eased the rest of the dead.
Observances of a more religious nature have survived. These include public processions or private visits to cemeteries and decorating graves with flowers and lights. This feast is observed with great fervor in Mexico.

Reflection

Whether or not one should pray for the dead is one of the great arguments which divide Christians. Appalled by the abuse of indulgences in the Church of his day, Martin Luther rejected the concept of purgatory. Yet prayer for a loved one is, for the believer, a way of erasing any distance, even death. In prayer we stand in God’s presence in the company of someone we love, even if that person has gone before us into death.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/commemoration-of-all-the-faithful-departed/

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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