A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.3

Daily Devotional: Angels/Apostles Gift of the Holy Spirit: Piety—the gift of filial love for God that moves the soul to worship and protects against the hardening of one’s heart in the midst of trials. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the Holy Spirit.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, may we take comfort in the Invisible Reality. There is no division between heaven and earth. All of heaven is available to us if we but ask. Jesus: Jesus was gentle with the woman caught in adultery. May we imitate His gentleness in dealing with others.
Glorious Characteristic: Identity—we will retain our original identity. We will be essentially the same person as before we died. (John 20:11-16) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Admonish sinners Corporal Work of Mercy: Welcome those away from home (the Church). Shelter the homeless. Sacrament: Communion Commandment:
  1. You shall not kill.
Thought for the Day: St. Augustine: “You have made us for yourself, O Lord; our hearts are restless until they rest in Thee.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of Pope St. Gregory the Great

Gregory was the prefect of Rome before he was 30. After five years in office he resigned, founded six monasteries on his Sicilian estate, and became a Benedictine monk in his own home at Rome.
Ordained a priest, Gregory became one of the pope’s seven deacons, and also served six years in the East as papal representative in Constantinople. He was recalled to become abbot, but at the age of 50 was elected pope by the clergy and people of Rome.
Gregory was direct and firm. He removed unworthy priests from office, forbade taking money for many services, emptied the papal treasury to ransom prisoners of the Lombards and to care for persecuted Jews and the victims of plague and famine. He was very concerned about the conversion of England, sending 40 monks from his own monastery. He is known for his reform of the liturgy, and for strengthening respect for doctrine. Whether he was largely responsible for the revision of “Gregorian” chant is disputed.
Gregory lived in a time of perpetual strife with invading Lombards and difficult relations with the East. When Rome itself was under attack, he interviewed the Lombard king.
His book, Pastoral Care, on the duties and qualities of a bishop, was read for centuries after his death. He described bishops mainly as physicians whose main duties were preaching and the enforcement of discipline. In his own down-to-earth preaching, Gregory was skilled at applying the daily Gospel to the needs of his listeners. Called “the Great,” Gregory has been given a place with Augustine, Ambrose, and Jerome, as one of the four key doctors of the Western Church.
An Anglican historian has written: “It is impossible to conceive what would have been the confusion, the lawlessness, the chaotic state of the Middle Ages without the medieval papacy; and of the medieval papacy, the real father is Gregory the Great.”

Reflection
Gregory was content to be a monk, but he willingly served the Church in other ways when asked. He sacrificed his own preferences in many ways, especially when he was called to be Bishop of Rome. Once he was called to public service, Gregory gave his considerable energies completely to this work. Gregory’s description of bishops as physicians fits in well with Pope Francis’ description of the Church as a “field hospital.”
He is the patron saint of England, epilepsy, musicians and teachers.
Pope St. Gregory the Great, pray for us.

Fr. Don Miller, OFM www.franciscanmedia.com

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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