A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Wednesday

<August 21, 2019>

Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.4

Daily Devotional: St. Joseph Gift of the Holy Spirit: Courage, Fortitude—firm resolution to pursue holiness despite obstacles. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the Holy Catholic Church.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, may we all fulfill our duty by living our vocation. May all Christians share the vocation of beatitude. Jesus: Jesus served the poor, the sick, the sinners. May we imitate Him in our eagerness to serve others.
Glorious Characteristic: Agility—we will have complete freedom of movement, our souls will direct our bodies without hindrance. (Luke 24:15,31,36) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Be patient with those in error. Corporal Work of Mercy: Visit the sick. Sacrament: Marriage Commandment:
  1. You shall not commit adultery.
Thought for the Day: “Preach the gospel at all times, and if necessary use words.” — St. Francis. Let your actions depict the beatitudes.

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Pius X

Pope Pius X is perhaps best remembered for his encouragement of the frequent reception of Holy Communion, especially by children.
The second of 10 children in a poor Italian family, Joseph Sarto became Pius X at age 68. He was one of the 20th century’s greatest popes.
Ever mindful of his humble origin, Pope Pius stated, ‘I was born poor, I lived poor, I will die poor.’ He was embarrassed by some of the pomp of the papal court. ‘Look how they have dressed me up,’ he said in tears to an old friend. To another, ‘It is a penance to be forced to accept all these practices. They lead me around surrounded by soldiers like Jesus when he was seized in Gethsemane.’
Interested in politics, Pope Pius encouraged Italian Catholics to become more politically involved. One of his first papal acts was to end the supposed right of governments to interfere by veto in papal elections—a practice that reduced the freedom of the 1903 conclave which had elected him.
In 1905, when France renounced its agreement with the Holy See and threatened confiscation of Church property if governmental control of Church affairs were not granted, Pius X courageously rejected the demand.
While he did not author a famous social encyclical as his predecessor had done, he denounced the ill treatment of indigenous peoples on the plantations of Peru, sent a relief commission to Messina after an earthquake, and sheltered refugees at his own expense.
On the 11th anniversary of his election as pope, Europe was plunged into World War I. Pius had foreseen it, but it killed him. ‘This is the last affliction the Lord will visit on me. I would gladly give my life to save my poor children from this ghastly scourge.’ He died a few weeks after the war began, and was canonized in 1954.

Reflection
His humble background was no obstacle in relating to a personal God and to people whom he loved genuinely. Pius X gained his strength, his gentleness and warmth for people from the source of all gifts, the Spirit of Jesus. In contrast, we often feel embarrassed by our backgrounds. Shame makes us prefer to remain aloof from people whom we perceive as superior. If we are in a superior position, on the other hand, we often ignore simpler people. Yet we, too, have to help “restore all things in Christ,” especially the wounded people of God.
St. Pius X, pray for us.

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Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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