A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.3

Daily Devotional: Angels/Apostles Gift of the Holy Spirit: Piety—the gift of filial love for God that moves the soul to worship and protects against the hardening of one’s heart in the midst of trials. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the Holy Spirit.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, may we take comfort in the Invisible Reality. There is no division between heaven and earth. All of heaven is available to us if we but ask. Jesus: Jesus was gentle with the woman caught in adultery. May we imitate His gentleness in dealing with others.
Glorious Characteristic: Identity—we will retain our original identity. We will be essentially the same person as before we died. (John 20:11-16) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Admonish sinners Corporal Work of Mercy: Welcome those away from home (the Church). Shelter the homeless. Sacrament: Communion Commandment:
  1. You shall not kill.
Thought for the Day: St. Augustine: “You have made us for yourself, O Lord; our hearts are restless until they rest in Thee.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Bernard

St. Bernard, Abbot and Doctor of the Church St. Bernard was born of noble parentage in Burgundy, France, in the castle of Fontaines near Dijon. Under the care of his pious parents he was sent at an early age to a college at Chatillon, where he was conspicuous for his remarkable piety and spirit of recollection. At the same place he entered upon the studies of theology and Holy Scripture. After the death of his mother, fearing the snares and temptations of the world, he resolved to embrace the newly established and very austere institute of the Cistercian Order, of which he was destined to become the greatest ornament. He also persuaded his brothers and several of his friends to follow his example. In 1113, St. Bernard, with thirty young noblemen, presented himself to the holy Abbot, St. Stephen, at Citeaux. After a novitiate spent in great fervor, he made his profession in the following year. His superior soon after, seeing the great progress he had made in the spiritual life, sent him with twelve monks to found a new monastery, which afterward became known as the celebrated Abbey of Clairvaux. St. Bernard was at once appointed Abbot and began that active life which has rendered him the most conspicuous figure in the history of the 12th century. He founded numerous other monasteries, composed a number of works and undertook many journeys for the honor of God. Several Bishoprics were offered him, but he refused them all. The reputation of St. Bernard spread far and wide; even the Popes were governed by his advice. He was commissioned by Pope Eugene III to preach the second Crusade. In obedience to the Sovereign Pontiff he traveled through France and Germany, and aroused the greatest enthusiasm for the holy war among the masses of the population. The failure of the expedition raised a great storm against the saint, but he attributed it to the sins of the Crusaders. St. Bernard was eminently endowed with the gift of miracles. He died on August 20, 1153.
St. Bernard, pray for us.

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Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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