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Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.7

Daily Devotional: The Blessed Virgin Mary Gift of the Holy Spirit: Wisdom—the gift of contemplative reflection on, and love for, divine things. It enables one to assess the world by revealed truths and instills peace in the soul. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting.” The Blessed Mother: May we experience God’s protection as Mary did, by imitating her obedience to God’s Will. Protection Through Obedience. Jesus: The life of Christ exemplified prudence, always seeking to do God’s Will alone. May we do the same.
Glorious Characteristic: Impassability—we will be immune from death and pain. (Rev 21:4, I Cor 15:50-57) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Forgive offenses. Corporal Work of Mercy: Give drink to the thirsty. Sacrament: Anointing of the Sick Commandments:
  1. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
  2. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Do whatever He tells you.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Lawrence

The esteem in which the Church holds Lawrence is seen in the fact that today’s celebration ranks as a feast. We know very little about his life. He is one of those whose martyrdom made a deep and lasting impression on the early Church. Celebration of his feast day spread rapidly.
He was a Roman deacon under Pope Saint Sixtus II. Four days after this pope was put to death, Lawrence and four clerics suffered martyrdom, probably during the persecution of the Emperor Valerian.
Legendary details of Lawrence’s death were known to Damasus, Prudentius, Ambrose, and Augustine. The church built over his tomb became one of the seven principal churches in Rome and a favorite place for Roman pilgrimages.
A well-known legend has persisted from earliest times. As deacon in Rome, Lawrence was charged with the responsibility for the material goods of the Church, and the distribution of alms to the poor. When Lawrence knew he would be arrested like the pope, he sought out the poor, widows, and orphans of Rome and gave them all the money he had on hand, selling even the sacred vessels of the altar to increase the sum. When the prefect of Rome heard of this, he imagined that the Christians must have considerable treasure. He sent for Lawrence and said, “You Christians say we are cruel to you, but that is not what I have in mind. I am told that your priests offer in gold, that the sacred blood is received in silver cups, that you have golden candlesticks at your evening services. Now, your doctrine says you must render to Caesar what is his. Bring these treasures—the emperor needs them to maintain his forces. God does not cause money to be counted: He brought none of it into the world with him—only words. Give me the money, therefore, and be rich in words.”
Lawrence replied that the Church was indeed rich. “I will show you a valuable part. But give me time to set everything in order and make an inventory.” After three days he gathered a great number of blind, lame, maimed, leprous, orphaned, and widowed persons and put them in rows. When the prefect arrived, Lawrence simply said, “These are the treasure of the Church.”
The prefect was so angry he told Lawrence that he would indeed have his wish to die—but it would be by inches. He had a great gridiron prepared with coals beneath it, and had Lawrence’s body placed on it. After the martyr had suffered the pain for a long time, the legend concludes, he made his famous cheerful remark, “It is well done. Turn me over!”

Reflection
Once again we have a saint about whom almost nothing is known, yet one who has received extraordinary honor in the Church since the fourth century. Almost nothing—yet the greatest fact of his life is certain: He died for Christ. We who are hungry for details about the lives of the saints are again reminded that their holiness was after all, a total response to Christ, expressed perfectly by a death like this.
Saint Lawrence is the Patron Saint of Cooks and the Poor.
St. Lawrence, pray for us.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-lawrence/

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Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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