A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Thursday

<July 11, 2019>

Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy.5

Daily Devotional: The Holy Eucharist/Priesthood Gift of the Holy Spirit: Counsel—the gift that assists decision making and helps to guard against rashness; as an interior guide, it assists one to counsel others and to extend compassion to them. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the Communion of Saints.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother after the passion, may we refrain from judging others. Mary’s example was an encouragement to the apostles. Jesus: In imitation of Jesus, may we treat all those we encounter with kindness.
Glorious Characteristic: Quality—our bodies will be youthful and will retain our original gender. (Practice seeing all as a child of God.) (Rev 1:12-18) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Counsel the doubtful. Corporal Work of Mercy: Bury the dead. Sacrament: Holy Orders Commandment:
  1. You shall not steal.
Thought for the Day: Padre Pio: “Pray, hope and don’t worry.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Benedict of Nursia

It is unfortunate that no contemporary biography was written of a man who has exercised the greatest influence on monasticism in the West. Benedict is well recognized in the later Dialogues of Saint Gregory, but these are sketches to illustrate miraculous elements of his career.
Benedict was born into a distinguished family in central Italy, studied at Rome, and early in life was drawn to monasticism. At first he became a hermit, leaving a depressing world—pagan armies on the march, the Church torn by schism, people suffering from war, morality at a low ebb.
He soon realized that he could not live a hidden life in a small town any better than in a large city, so he withdrew to a cave high in the mountains for three years. Some monks chose Benedict as their leader for a while, but found his strictness not to their taste. Still the shift from hermit to community life had begun for him. He had an idea of gathering various families of monks into one “Grand Monastery” to give them the benefit of unity, fraternity, and permanent worship in one house. Finally he began to build what was to become one of the most famous monasteries in the world—Monte Cassino, commanding three narrow valleys running toward the mountains north of Naples.
The Rule that gradually developed prescribed a life of liturgical prayer, study, manual labor, and living together in community under a common abbot. Benedictine asceticism is known for its moderation, and Benedictine charity has always shown concern for the people in the surrounding countryside. In the course of the Middle Ages, all monasticism in the West was gradually brought under the Rule of St. Benedict.
Today the Benedictine family is represented by two branches: the Benedictine Federation encompassing the men and women of the Order of St. Benedict, and the Cistercians, men and women of the Order of Cistercians of the Strict Observance.

Reflection
The Church has been blessed through Benedictine devotion to the liturgy, not only in its actual celebration with rich and proper ceremony in the great abbeys, but also through the scholarly studies of many of its members. Liturgy is sometimes confused with guitars or choirs, Latin or Bach. We should be grateful to those who both preserve and adapt the genuine tradition of worship in the Church.
Saint Benedict is the Patron Saint of Europe, Kidney Disease, Monks, Poisoning, and Schoolchildren.

St. Benedict of Nursia, pray for us.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-benedict/

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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