A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of God.1

Daily Devotional: The Holy Trinity/The Resurrection Gift of the Holy Spirit: Fear of the Lord—a gift of reverence for God. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in God the Father.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, we are called to the humility she possessed at the Annunciation. Jesus: In imitation of Jesus, we are called to the humility He showed at becoming man.
Glorious Characteristic: Subtlety—our bodies will be free from restraint by matter, yet palpable. (John 20:19-23) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Pray for the living and the dead Corporal Work of Mercy: Feed the hungry Sacrament: Baptism Commandments:
  1. I am the Lord Your God; you shall not have strange gods before Me.
  2. You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain.
  3. Remember to keep holy the Lord’s Day.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Let it be done to me according to Your Word.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Crispin of Viterbo

St. Crispin was born in 1668 and died in 1750. When he was five years old, his pious mother took him to a sanctuary of the Blessed Virgin, a short distance from Viterbo, where she consecrated him to the Mother of God and placed him under her special protection. The child grew beyond his years in virtue and science of the saints; so that the townsfold of Viterbo were wont to call him il Santarello, the little saint. As Crispin one day saw the Capuchin novices walking in procession, God inspired him with the desire to embrace the religious life. He was shortly afterwards received into the Franciscan Order as a simple lay brother. Having been employed for some time as cook in the convent at Viterbo, he was sent to Tolfa, a town not far distant from Civita Becchia, to fulfil the same office. Thence he was sent to Rome and finally to Albano. Here Crispin was visited by the men of the world, by bishops and cardinals, and even by the pope himself, who always took delight in conversing with the humble lay brother. It was Crispin’s constant endeavour to imitate the virtues of his patron, St. Felix of Cantalice, whom he had chosen as his model of perfection at the beginning of his religious life. Like St. Felix, he used to call himself the ass or beast of burden of the Capuchins, and, having on one occasion been asked by a stranger why he went bare-headed, Crispin answered jocosely, that “an ass does not wear a hat.” Enfeebled by old age and by his numerous austerities, he was sent to Rome by his superiors, there to end his holy life. His body, which even at the present time is still in a remarkable state of preservation, rests under one of the side altars in the church of the Capuchin Fathers in Rome. Blessed Crispin was solemnly beatified by Pope Pius VII in 1806. His feast is celebrated only by the Capuchins.

St. Crispin of Viterbo, pray for us.
Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.

http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/C/stcrispinofviterbo.asp

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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