A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God.7

Daily Devotional: The Blessed Virgin Mary Gift of the Holy Spirit: Wisdom—the gift of contemplative reflection on, and love for, divine things. It enables one to assess the world by revealed truths and instills peace in the soul. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the resurrection of the body and life everlasting.” The Blessed Mother: May we experience God’s protection as Mary did, by imitating her obedience to God’s Will. Protection Through Obedience. Jesus: The life of Christ exemplified prudence, always seeking to do God’s Will alone. May we do the same.
Glorious Characteristic: Impassability—we will be immune from death and pain. (Rev 21:4, I Cor 15:50-57) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Forgive offenses. Corporal Work of Mercy: Give drink to the thirsty. Sacrament: Anointing of the Sick Commandments:
  1. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife.
  2. You shall not covet your neighbor’s goods.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Do whatever He tells you.”

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of Blessed Charles Foucauld

Born into an aristocratic family in Strasbourg, France, Charles was orphaned at the age of 6, raised by his devout grandfather, rejected the Catholic faith as a teenager, and joined the French army. Inheriting a great deal of money from his grandfather, Charles went to Algeria with his regiment, but not without his mistress, Mimi.
When he declined to give her up, he was dismissed from the army. Still in Algeria when he left Mimi, Charles reenlisted in the army. Refused permission to make a scientific exploration of nearby Morocco, he resigned from the service. With the help of a Jewish rabbi, Charles disguised himself as a Jew and in 1883, began a one-year exploration that he recorded in a book that was well received.
Inspired by the Jews and Muslims whom he met, Charles resumed the practice of his Catholic faith when he returned to France in 1886. He joined a Trappist monastery in Ardeche, France, and later transferred to one in Akbes, Syria. Leaving the monastery in 1897, Charles worked as gardener and sacristan for the Poor Clare nuns in Nazareth and later in Jerusalem. In 1901, he returned to France and was ordained a priest.
Later that year Charles journeyed to Beni-Abbes, Morocco, intending to found a monastic religious community in North Africa that offered hospitality to Christians, Muslims, Jews, or people with no religion. He lived a peaceful, hidden life but attracted no companions.
A former army comrade invited him to live among the Tuareg people in Algeria. Charles learned their language enough to write a Tuareg-French and French-Tuareg dictionary, and to translate the Gospels into Tuareg. In 1905, he came to Tamanrasset, where he lived the rest of his life. A two-volume collection of Charles’ Tuareg poetry was published after his death.
In early 1909, he visited France and established an association of laypeople who pledged to live by the Gospels. His return to Tamanrasset was welcomed by the Tuareg. In 1915, Charles wrote to Louis Massignon: “The love of God, the love for one’s neighbor…All religion is found there…How to get to that point? Not in a day since it is perfection itself: it is the goal we must always aim for, which we must unceasingly try to reach and that we will only attain in heaven.”
The outbreak of World War I led to attacks on the French in Algeria. Seized in a raid by another tribe, Charles and two French soldiers coming to visit him were shot to death on December 1, 1916.
Five religious congregations, associations, and spiritual institutes—Little Brothers of Jesus, Little Sisters of the Sacred Heart, Little Sisters of Jesus, Little Brothers of the Gospel, and Little Sisters of the Gospel—draw inspiration from the peaceful, largely hidden, yet hospitable life that characterized Charles. He was beatified on November 13, 2005.

Blessed Charles Foucauld, pray for us.

https://www.franciscanmedia.org/blessed-charles-de-foucauld/

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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