A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Wednesday

<July 11, 2018>

Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.4

Daily Devotional: St. Joseph Gift of the Holy Spirit: Courage, Fortitude—firm resolution to pursue holiness despite obstacles. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in the Holy Catholic Church.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, may we all fulfill our duty by living our vocation. May all Christians share the vocation of beatitude. Jesus: Jesus served the poor, the sick, the sinners. May we imitate Him in our eagerness to serve others.
Glorious Characteristic: Agility—we will have complete freedom of movement, our souls will direct our bodies without hindrance. (Luke 24:15,31,36) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Be patient with those in error. Corporal Work of Mercy: Visit the sick. Sacrament: Marriage Commandment:
  1. You shall not commit adultery.
Thought for the Day: “Preach the gospel at all times, and if necessary use words.” — St. Francis. Let your actions depict the beatitudes.

Today’s Reading

Feast Day of St. Benedict of Nursia

St. Benedict, the Father of Western monasticism and brother of Scholastica, is considered the patron of speliologists (cave explorers). He was born in Nursia, Italy and educated in Rome. He was repelled by the vices of the city and in about the year 500, fled to Enfide, thirty miles away. He decided to live the life of a hermit and settled at the mountainous Subiaco, where he lived in a cave for three years, fed by a monk named Romanus. Despite Benedict’s desire for solitude, his holiness and austerities became known and he was asked to be their abbot by a community of monks at Vicovaro. He accepted, but when the monks resisted his strict rule and tried to poison him, he returned to Subiaco and became a center of spirituality and learning. He left suddenly, reportedly because of the efforts of a neighboring priest, Florentius, to undermine his work, and in about 525, settled at Monte Cassino. He destroyed a pagan temple to Apollo on its crest, brought the people of the neighboring area back to Christianity, and in about 530 began to build the monastery that was to be the birthplace of Western monasticism. Soon disciples again flocked to him as his reputation for holiness, wisdom, and miracles spread far and wide. He organized the monks into a single monastic community and wrote his famous Rule prescribing common sense, a life of moderate asceticism, prayer, study, and work, and community life under one superior. It stressed obedience, stability, zeal, and had the Divine Office as the center of monastic life; it was to affect spiritual and monastic life in the West for centuries to come. While ruling his monks (most of whom, including Benedict, were not ordained), he counseled rulers and Popes, ministered to the poor and destitute about him, and tried to repair the ravages of the Lombard Totila’s invasion. He died at Monte Cassino on March 21 and was named patron protector of Europe by Pope Paul VI in 1964. His feast day is July 11.

St. Benedict of Nursia, pray for us.

https://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=556

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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