A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of God.1

Daily Devotional: The Holy Trinity/The Resurrection Gift of the Holy Spirit: Fear of the Lord—a gift of reverence for God. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in God the Father.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, we are called to the humility she possessed at the Annunciation. Jesus: In imitation of Jesus, we are called to the humility He showed at becoming man.
Glorious Characteristic: Subtlety—our bodies will be free from restraint by matter, yet palpable. (John 20:19-23) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Pray for the living and the dead Corporal Work of Mercy: Feed the hungry Sacrament: Baptism Commandments:
  1. I am the Lord Your God; you shall not have strange gods before Me.
  2. You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain.
  3. Remember to keep holy the Lord’s Day.
Thought for the Day: Blessed Virgin Mary: “Let it be done to me according to Your Word.”

Today’s Reading

The Feast of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ

According to Canon Law (Can. 944 §1,2) “Wherever in the judgment of the diocesan Bishop it can be done, a procession through the streets is to be held, especially on the solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, as a public witness of veneration of the Blessed Eucharist. It is for the diocesan Bishop to establish such regulations about processions as will provide participation in them and for their being carried out in a dignified manner.” Note that such processions can take place throughout the liturgical year but are “especially” encouraged on the feast of Corpus Christi. No other devotion has received such attention in the Code of Canon Law which shows the importance the Church attaches to this feast. It is one of the few feasts which is mentioned along with Holy Days of Obligation: “… the following holy days are to be observed: the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, the Epiphany, the Ascension of Christ, the feast of the Body and Blood of Christ, the feast of Mary, the Mother of God, the Immaculate Conception, the Assumption, the feast of St. Joseph, the feast of the Apostles Sts. Peter and Paul, and the feast of All Saints.” (Can. 1246 §1)

The full name of this feast is Corpus et Sanguis Christi or The Body and Blood of Christ. “The feast of the Blessed Sacrament was established in 1246 by Bishop Robert de Thorte of Liege at the suggestion of St. Juliana of Mont Carvillon. [It was] extended to the universal Church by Pope Urban in 1264. The office composed by St. Thomas Aquinas and customary procession was approved by Popes Martin V and Eugene IV. Celebrated in June, the first Sunday after the feast of the Trinity.” (Modern Catholic Dictionary, by John A. Hardon, S.J.)

St. Juliana, a Belgian nun in Retinne, lived at the time of St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Louis. She received this inspiration from Our Lord for the following reasons: 1) that the Catholic doctrine receive aid from the institution of this festival at a time when the faith of the world was growing cold and heresies were rife; 2) that the faithful who love and seek truth and piety may be enabled to draw from this source of life new strength and vigor to walk continually in the way of virtue; 3) that irreverence and sacrilegious behavior towards the Divine Majesty in this adorable Sacrament may, by sincere and profound adoration, be extirpated and repaired; 4) to announce to the Christian world His will that the feast be observed. (Full Brief of Pope Urban IV in The Blessed Eucharist, Fr. Michael Muller, C.S.S.R., 1867; republished by TAN Publishers, Rockford, IL 1994.)

After the last Mass on this feast day Our Lord is placed in the monstrance. The priest then carries Him to four different altars representing the four corners of the earth. While processing, the congregation follows and sings. At each altar there are readings, prayers, and benediction.

Compiled and Written by Michael and Carole Breslin http://www.therealpresence.org/eucharst/pea/cchristi.htm

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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