A Daily Guide to Living in Beatitude Menu Button

Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted.2

Daily Devotional: Holy Spirit/Holy Souls Gift of the Holy Spirit: Knowledge—the correct estimation of created things and their relative value before God. Proclamation of Faith: “I believe in Jesus Christ.” The Blessed Mother: In imitation of the Blessed Mother, let us look to Jesus as our Good Shepherd. Jesus: In imitation of Jesus, let us imitate His generosity of heart in being merciful to others.
Glorious Characteristic: Integrity—we will retain all the parts of our old bodies, our bodies will be complete. (John 20:24-27) Spiritual Work of Mercy: Comfort the sorrowful. Corporal Work of Mercy: Comfort the imprisoned. Sacrament: Confirmation Commandment:
  1. Honor your father and mother.
Thought for the Day: Adapted from Mother Teresa: Prayer leads to humility, which leads to obedience, which leads to love, which leads to eternal life.

Today’s Reading

Three Insights about the Holy Spirit

Saint Augustine’s experience of the love of God present in the Church led him to three particular insights about the Holy Spirit as the bond of unity within the Blessed Trinity; unity as communion, unity as abiding love, and unity as giving and gift. These three insights help explain how the Spirit works.

In a world where both individuals and communities often suffer from an absence of unity or cohesion, these insights help us remain attuned to the Spirit and to extend and clarify the scope of our witness. Augustine noted that the two words “Holy” and “Spirit” refer to what is divine about God; in other words, what is shared by the Father and the Son—their communion. So, if the distinguishing characteristic of the Holy Spirit is to be what is shared by the Father and the Son, Augustine concluded that the Spirit’s particular quality is unity. It is a unity of lived communion: a unity of persons in a relationship of constant giving, the Father and the Son giving themselves to each other…True unity could never be founded upon relationships which deny the equal dignity of other persons. Nor is unity simply the sum total of the groups through which we sometimes attempt to “define” ourselves. In fact, only in the life of communion is unity sustained and human identity fulfilled: we recognize the common need for God, we respond to the unifying presence of the Holy Spirit, and we give ourselves to one another in service.

Augustine’s second insight [is that of] the Holy Spirit as abiding love. Reflecting on the lasting nature of love—“whoever abides in love remains in God and God in him”—he wondered: is it love or the Holy Spirit which grants the abiding? This is the conclusion he reaches: “The Holy Spirit makes us remain in God and God in us; yet it is love that effects this. The Spirit therefore is God as love!”…God shares himself as love in the Holy Spirit…Love is the sign of the presence of the Holy Spirit! Ideas or voices which lack love—even if they seem sophisticated or knowledgeable—cannot be “of the Spirit.” Furthermore, love has a particular trait: far from being indulgent or fickle, it has a task or purpose to fulfill: to abide. By its nature love is enduring. Again we catch a further glimpse of how much the Holy Spirit offers our world: love which dispels uncertainty; love which overcomes the fear of betrayal; love which carries eternity within; the true love which draws us into a unity that abides!

The third insight: the Holy Spirit as gift. The Spirit is “God’s gift” (John 4:10) the internal spring (cf John 4:14), who truly satisfies our deepest thirst and leads us to the Father. From this observation Augustine concludes that God sharing himself with us as gift is the Holy Spirit…Again we catch a glimpse of the Trinity at work: the Holy Spirit is God eternally giving himself; like a never-ending spring he pours forth nothing less than himself…We begin to understand why the quest for novelty leaves us unsatisfied and wanting. Are we not looking for an eternal gift? The spring that will never run dry?…

Inspired by the insights of Saint Augustine: let unifying love be your measure; abiding love your challenge; self-giving love your mission!

Pope Benedict XVI Magnificat May 2012 Vol 14, No 3, Pages 371-372

About Us

Mission

We could find no better way to describe the purpose of Daily Beatitude than the Prologue of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Paragraph 1:

God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life.

Content

We are called to live in beatitude. This contemplation is one designed to help us incorporate the beatitudes into our day. This work is not one of absolutes. It is just one way to incorporate the countenance of Jesus into each day. It is not the only way. View our rationale.

Each day a different beatitude is presented with several points of focus that provide meditation. An additional reading is included daily related to the beatitude or one of the points of focus. All readings are archived for your convenience.

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